Gifts of love in ancient China

Have you ever been caught up in a situation that leaves you clueless on what item to buy for your boyfriend or girlfriend? The ancient Chinese were never baffled by this problem. Here are some classic gifts for lovers during ancient times. Check it out and it may provide you with unique gift ideas.

Jade pendants

a pair of Qing Dynasty jade pendants170
a pair of Qing Dynasty jade pendants171

The ancient Chinese usually gave their lovers something small so that they could easily take it everywhere. A jade pendant is a good choice. Moreover, according to old customs, ancient couples sometimes exchanged their jade pendants at their engagement ceremony, so these little jade decorations top the list of ancient love gifts.

Hairpins

a pair of hairpins during Qing Dynasty172
A set of hairpins during Qing Dynasty173

Hairpins were also a common gift for a man to give his girlfriend in ancient times. An old tradition in China was that women would cut a small lock of hair to give to their beloved at their engagement, so hair decorations symbolize a promise of love.

Comb

a Qing Dynasty comb174
a Han Dynasty comb175

There is a beautiful Chinese idiom, “Bai tou xie lao”, meaning the happy couple will be together until their hair turns white. Giving a comb to a loved one is a romantic promise which means “I want to be with you until we get old together”.

Jade bracelet

a pair of jade bracelet during Qing Dynasty176
a pair of jade bracelet during Qing Dynasty177

Ancient Chinese women loved bracelets so much. It never fails to give a woman a pair of exquisite jade bracelets.

Fan pendant

a fan pendant during Qing Dynasty179

Ancient Chinese men usually carried folding fans in summer. A fan pendant for the man you loved was a good idea in ancient times.

Hand-made Purse

a set of embroidered purses during Qing Dynasty180
a pair of embroidered purses during Qing Dynasty181

Most ancient Chinese women were good at embroidery. A hand-made embroidered purse for the man they loved represents their true love.

 

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com

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